You’re welcome! – Jyssica Schwartz

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Jyssica Schwartz
You’re welcome Jyssica Schwartz


You’re welcome!

When it comes to pricing, it can be hard to pick the “right” price, because writing is a scale of pricing.

Try it this way: Decide how much you want to make per year (example: $60k US). Then break it down. $60k is $5k per month. $5k per month divided by 160 hours (4 weeks of 40 hours) is $31.25 per hour. If you can bill for a full 40 hours per week, but that is unlikely, so think about 1.5 or 2 timesing that amount. So, let’s say you want to charge $60 per hour for your time and work. If a 1000-word article is going to take you about 2 hours, then 1000 words divided by $120 (2 hours of work) equals 8.3 cents. So you’d want to charge that client about 8 cents per word for you to be where you want to be.

Another way to look at it is to just look at per-word rates without breaking it all down from hourly. If you do 10 cents per word, that is $100 for a 1000-word article, no matter how long it takes you. Some articles take longer, some take less time. So, you may want to have a flat rate you use, such as 10 cents per word, which is a decently average to above-average rate. Charge the rate for a period of time, say 2 weeks or 1 month, and then see how many hours you were able to do paid work and how much you made. This will give you a good gauge to see what you’d make doing more or fewer hours or raising your prices.

A general guideline is that 5–7.5 cents per word is below-average, 8–11 cents per word is average, 12–15 cents per word is slightly above-average, and 15+ cents per word is an experienced writer.

It’s all about valuing your time and making sure your pricing includes the time it takes to do research, backlinks, citing sources, grabbing a photo, and any revisions you offer.



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